Rugby Basics & FAQs

Rugby is a game that anyone, any size, speed or strength can enjoy and be a part of a team. It is a very open and welcoming community.

  • How is Rugby played?
    Game Objective: Run the ball into the opposite “try zone” (like the end zone in football) and score 5 points by touching the ball down to the ground. Now, this is super tricky because you can’t pass the ball forward, and whoever has the ball is fair game to be tackled. Once on the ground, they have to release the ball. Every player on the field plays offense, defense, can pass, receive, catch, kick and tackle.

    Regular match play is 15 players on each team, known as 15s. A shorter, faster match play is 7 players on each team, know as 7s, which match time is two seven-minute halves. For NWRFC, our 7s team is proudly known as the Stone Dragons.

    Rugby-league-field

  • What's so special about Rugby?
    Rugby is a true team sport. There are countless instances during any given match where together a team can accomplish something no one individual could do on their own.

    As a team, we learn to trust each other. We learn to pass the ball and trust our teammate will be there to receive it. A side-effect is that we learn to be trustworthy and dependable, to be there for each other on and off the pitch. We also learn to trust ourselves, our strength and character and begin to understand how far these really go.

  • What about the Rugby community?
    Another positive aspect is the tight-knit rugby community and the colorful rugby culture. There is an undeniable camaraderie between rugby teams.

    Every match is followed by a unique social gathering, in which rugby songs are sung, traditions are passed down, the MVP is announced to the loudest of cheers from both sides equally, and strong bonds are formed. It is hard to describe the closeness that develops from pounding someone’s face into the ground, or binding on a teammate’s shorts for dear life during a ruck. Come experience it with us.

  • What are the positions in 15s Rugby?

    15s_true

    FOWARDS
    Props (1 and 3)
    What they do:

    Their primary role is to anchor the scrummage and provide lifting strength and support for the lineout jumpers. Also pivotal in rucks and mauls.

    What they need:
    Upper-body strength to provide stability in the scrum, endurance, mobility and safe hands to maintain continuity of play.

    Hooker (2)
    What they do:

    The hooker has two unique roles on the pitch as the player who wins possession in the scrum and usually throws the ball into the lineout.

    What they need:
    Great strength to withstand the physicality of the front row coupled with speed to get around the pitch and good throwing technique.

    Locks (4 and 5)
    What they do:

    Locks win the ball from lineouts and restarts. They drive forward momentum in the scrum, rucks and mauls providing a platform for attack.

    What they need:
    The key characteristic is height. The locks are the giants of the team and combine their physicality with great catching skills and mobility.

    Flankers (6 and 7)
    What they do:

    Their key objective is to win possession through turnovers, using physicality in the tackle and speed to the breakdown.

    What they need:
    An insatiable desire for big tackles and a no-fear approach to winning the ball. A combination of speed, strength, endurance and handling.

    Number 8 (8)
    What they do:

    The Number 8 must secure possession at the base of the scrum, carry the ball in open play, provide the link between the forwards and backs in attacking phases and defend aggressively.

    What they need:
    Good handling skills are essential, as is a great awareness of space. Power and pace over short distances are crucial – gaining territory and field position for a quick release to the backs in attack.

    BACKS

    Scrum Half (9)
    What they do:

    Provides the link between forwards and backs at the scrum and lineouts. A true decision-maker, the 9 will judge whether to distribute quick ball to the backs or keep it close to the forwards.

    What they need:
    A multi-faceted position, the scrum half must be powerful, have explosive speed, all-round handling and kicking skills. The great 9s are highly confident players, with excellent game understanding.

    Fly Half (10)
    What they do:

    As the player who orchestrates the team’s performance, the 10 will receive the ball from the 9 and choose to kick, pass or make a break based upon split-second interpretation of the phase of play.

    What they need:
    The ability to kick well out of hand, ideally on either foot, deft handling skills, pace, vision, creativity, communication skills, tactical awareness and the ability to perform under pressure.

    Wings (11 and 14)
    What they do:

    The wings are on the pitch to provide the injection of out-and-out pace needed to outrun an opponent and score a try. Also important to be solid in defense.

    What they need:
    Pace. Wings will often find themselves in open space, when their number one priority is to press the accelerator and run for the line. Strength and good handling are an advantage too.

    Centers (12 and 13)
    What they do:

    The centers are key in both defense and attack. In defense they will attempt to tackle attacking players whilst in attack they will use their speed, power and creative flair to breach defenses.

    What they need:
    The modern-day centre is lean, strong and extremely quick. The position demands great attacking prowess, coupled with an intensity in contact to either retain or steal possession.

    Full Back (15)
    What they do:

    Generally perceived as the last line of defense, the full back must be confident under a high ball, have a good boot to clear the lines and enjoy the physicality required to make try-saving tackles.

    What they need:
    Great handling skills, pace in attack and power in defence. An ability to join the line at pace to create an overlap and try-scoring opportunities for the winger. Tactical skill and flair.

  • What are the positions in 7s Rugby?

    7s

    FORWARDS

    Props (1 and 3)
    What they do:

    Their primary role is to anchor the scrummage and provide lifting strength and support for the lineout jumpers. Also pivotal in rucks & mauls.

    What they need:
    Upper-body strength to provide stability in the scrum, endurance, mobility and safe hands to maintain continuity of play.

    Hooker (2)
    What they do:

    The hooker has two unique roles on the pitch as the player who wins possession in the scrum and usually throws the ball in to the lineout.

    What they need:
    Great strength to withstand the physicality of the front row coupled with speed to get around the pitch and good throwing technique.

    BACKS

    Scrum Half (4)
    What they do:

    Provides the link between forwards and backs at the scrum and lineouts. A true decision-maker, the 9 will judge whether to distribute quick ball to the backs or keep it close to the forwards.

    What they need:
    A multi-faceted position, the scrum half must be powerful, have explosive speed, all-round handling and kicking skills. The great 9s are highly confident players, with excellent game understanding.

    Fly Half (5)
    What they do:

    As the player who orchestrates the team’s performance, the 10 will receive the ball from the 9 and choose to kick, pass or make a break based upon split-second interpretation of the phase of play.

    What they need:
    The ability to kick well out of hand, ideally on either foot, deft handling skills, pace, vision, creativity, communication skills, tactical awareness and the ability to perform under pressure.

    Center (6)
    What they do:

    The centers are key in both defense and attack. In defense they will attempt to tackle attacking players whilst in attack they will use their speed, power and creative flair to breach defenses.

    What they need:
    The modern-day centre is lean, strong and extremely quick. The position demands great attacking prowess, coupled with an intensity in contact to either retain or steal possession.

    Wing (7)
    What they do:

    The wings are on the pitch to provide the injection of out-and-out pace needed to outrun an opponent and score a try. Also important to be solid in defense.

    What they need:
    Pace. Wings will often find themselves in open space, when their number one priority is to press the accelerator and run for the line. Strength and good handling are an advantage too.

  • How will I ever learn how to play?
    Most of us have some past high school and college athletic experience in a variety of sports. You can depend on our experienced coaches and players to teach you the rules and skills you need to play the game.
  • Am I too small to play Rugby?
    You can never be too small to play rugby. Everyone on the team plays a special role. In most cases, the smaller players are the fittest and the fastest. Remember that in rugby you play two 40 minute halves of continuous play and the first 20 minutes of the half are just as important as the second 20.
  • Who do you play against?
    We play other club teams and universities in the Southeast. We often enter rugby tournaments and the opponents vary depending on the tournament. If you are the competitive type, come out and play.
  • How much time will it take?

    We have regular mandatory practices Mondays and Wednesdays from 7 – 9pm at Douglas Park.

    Games are usually on Saturdays with a couple of overnighters to Sunday. Check out our upcoming games and events.

  • What are my chances of getting hurt?
    Every contact sport has its injuries. A lot of times people see professional rugby games and get the wrong impression. We will teach you the proper technique to reduce the chances of injury and make it as fun as possible. Don’t forget your mouthguard.
  • What are my chances of playing right away?
    Each team has 15 players on the field at one time. Experience usually helps because rugby is a skill sport, but don’t think you can’t come in and play the game. Many of our best players have only one season (or less) of playing experience.